A Virtual Tour of Green Libraries

 

Exploring Green Architecture

The DC Public Library has undergone a transformation, renovating and building 14 libraries in four years.

Most D.C. residents notice the striking architecture of our new buildings and the restored historical charm of our renovated locations. But few realize that all these building features design elements that support our environment and fight against climate change.

Join us on a virtual tour of some of our green libraries -- or use this as a guide to do your own citywide tour -- and discover the green secrets that each location holds!

View Green Libraries Virtual Tour in a larger map

 

William O. Lockridge/Bellevue Neighborhood Library

Designed by architecture team Adjaye Associates and Wiencek Associates, this library opened June 13, 2012. This earth-healthy building has:
  • Energy-efficient heating and cooling systems.
  • Low-flow faucets and toilets, to cut down on the amount of water we use and waste.
  • Recycled materials in the flooring, counter tops and wood finishes, to reduce our demands on earth's precious resources.
  • LEED "Gold" Certification for environmentally sustainable design from the U.S. Green Building Council.
William O. Lockridge/Bellevue Neighborhood Library
 

 Francis A. Gregory Neighborhood Library

The new library, also designed by Adjaye Associates and Wiencek Associates, opened on June 19, 2012. The building creates a stunning view, but it helps the environment too:
  • Energy-efficient heating and cooling systems, to reduce our energy usage.
  • Low-flow faucets and toilets, to cut down on the amount of water we use and waste.
  • Recycled materials in the flooring, counter tops and wood finishes.
  • Dought-tolerant landscaping, to cut down on our dependence on precious water to keep our landscapes looking pretty.
Francis A. Gregory Neighborhood Library(Photo by Eric Taylor)

Anacostia Neighborhood Library

Designed by the Freelon Group, the Library re-opened on April 26, 2010.  It has environmentally friendly features that include:
  • A roof that reflects sunlight and keeps the building cooler in the summer -- and cuts down on our energy usage.
  • Solar panels on the roof that provide hot water for the building by using a clean, renewable resource!
  • A bioretention pond next to the library that reduces the amount of rain water that enters the sewage system.
  • LEED "Gold" Certification for environmentally sustainable design from the U.S. Green Building Council.
Anacostia Neighborhood Library(Photo by Mark Herboth)

Dorothy I. Height/Benning Neighborhood Library

The two-story, 22,000-square-foot building opened April 5, 2010. Designed by the firm of Davis Brody Bond Aedas, the Benning Library has:
  • A vegetative green roof that protects the building from ultraviolet radiation and allows rainwater to be recycled for landscaping.
  • Energy-efficient lighting, to cut down on the amount of energy we use.
  • Parking space for energy-efficient vehicles, to encourage our customers to help the environment in other ways.
  • LEED "Gold" Certification for environmentally sustainable design from the U.S. Green Building Council.
Dorothy I. Height/Benning Neighborhood Library(Photo by Davis Brody Bond)

Watha T. Daniel/Shaw Neighborhood Library

Designed by the architecture firm of Davis Brody Bond Aedas, the Shaw Library opened on Aug. 2, 2010. Its environmentally friendly features include:
  • A part-reflective, part-vegetative green roof that helps protect the building from ultraviolet radiation and absorbs rainwater.
  • An energy-efficient heating and cooling system that helps us use less energy.
  • Use of paints, adhesives and carpets that won't emit harmful fumes, keeping us and our nearby environment healthy.
  • LEED "Gold" Certification for environmentally sustainable design from the U.S. Green Building Council.
Watha T. Daniel/Shaw Neighborhood Library(Photo by Paul Rivera)

Petworth Neighborhood Library

The building, originally completed in January 1939, was closed for renovations in late 2009 and reopened on Feb. 28, 2011. The historic location is more than 70 years young, thanks to some earth-wise improvements:
  • In the first-and second-floor reading rooms, floors made of natural cork, a sustainable resource that is renewable and recyclable.
  • Water-efficient toilets and faucets, which help us reduce the amount of water we use.
  • Use of paints, adhesives and carpets that won't emit harmful fumes, keeping us and our nearby environment healthy.
Petworth Neighborhood Library(Photo by Gordon Beall)

Mt. Pleasant Neighborhood Library

The renovated and expanded Mount Pleasant Neighborhood Library opened on Sept. 12, 2012. This historic building is earth-friendly from top to bottom:
  • A "cool roof" helps keep the building cool in the summer and reduces the "heat island effect."
  • Terra cotta sun shades that filter direct sunlight and help keep the building cool in the summer -- which also helps us cut down on our energy costs.
  • Drought-tolerant landscaping, to cut down on our dependence on precious water to keep our landscapes looking pretty.
Mt. Pleasant Neighborhood Library
 

Tenley/Friendship Neighborhood Library

The new library building, designed by The Freelon Group, opened in January of 2011. Its green features include:
  • A vegetative green roof that absorbs storm water and keeps the building cooler in the summer.
  • Low-flow faucets and toilets, which help us reduce the amount of water we use.
  • Recycled materials in flooring, counter tops and wood finishes, to ensure we'll have resources to use for years to come.
  • LEED "Gold" Certification for environmentally sustainable design from the U.S. Green Building Council.
Tenley-Friendship Neighborhood Library(Photo by Mark Herboth)

Georgetown Neighborhood Library

Severely damaged by a fire on April 30, 2007, the neighborhood library underwent a complete renovation, thanks to Martinez & Johnson Architects and Hoshide Williams. Georgetown proves that a building doesn't need to be brand-new to be green:
  • Energy-efficient heating and air conditioning systems, to cut down on the amount of energy we use.
  • Native, drought-resistant landscaping, to cut down on our dependence on precious water to keep our landscapes looking pretty.
  • Use of low-volatile organic compound (VOC) paints, adhesives and carpeting, keeping us and our nearby environment healthy.
Georgetown Neighborhood Library