Two New D.C. Public Libraries Awarded Gold for Being Green

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Two New D.C. Public Libraries Awarded Gold for Being Green

Today, Mayor Vincent C. Gray announced that the Tenley-Friendship and the Dorothy I. Height/Benning neighborhood libraries have been awarded the LEED® Gold standard established by the U.S. Green Building Council and verified by the Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI). LEED is the nation’s preeminent program for the design, construction and operation of high performance green buildings.

“The District of Columbia is on its way to being one of the most 'green' cities in America,” said Mayor Gray. “As we develop a city-wide sustainability plan, these libraries show us that inspiring designs can also be quality green buildings.”

“The library is proud to receive this honor,” said Ginnie Cooper, chief librarian for the District of Columbia. “These certifications speak to the great work done by our architecture teams and show that our 'green' practices include much more than lending books.”

“The green building movement offers an unprecedented opportunity to respond to the most-important challenges of our time, including global climate change, dependence on non-sustainable and expensive sources of energy and threats to human health,” said Rick Fedrizzi, President, CEO & Founding Chair, U.S. Green Building Council. “The work of innovative building projects such as the D.C. public libraries is a fundamental driving force in the green building movement.”

The libraries achieved LEED Gold certification for energy use, lighting, water and material use as well as incorporating a variety of other sustainable strategies. By using less energy and water, LEED certified buildings save money for families, businesses and taxpayers; reduce greenhouse gas emissions; and contribute to a healthier environment for residents, workers and the larger community.

The Tenley and the Dorothy I. Height/Benning neighborhood libraries LEED certification features include: vegetative “green” roofs; energy efficient lighting; low-flow automatic faucets; air hand dryers and low-flow toilets bathrooms; lots of natural light; recycled materials in flooring, countertops and wood finishes; bike racks and easy access to public transportation; and parking spaces for energy efficient vehicles.

About the DC Public Library

DC Public Library is building and renovating libraries across the city to provide state-of-the-art library services. To date, the DC Public Library has rebuilt or renovated 13 buildings.  All projects are designed to meet a LEED Certification of at least Silver.

Tenley-Friendship and the Dorothy I. Height/Benning neighborhood libraries have vegetative “green” roofs that absorb and slowly release water into the city's sewage system, decreasing the amount of raw sewage that can flow into rivers and decreasing the likelihood of flooding during heavy rainfall. Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and administered by the DC Department of the Environment, the roofs also control utility costs by reducing the amount of ultraviolet radiation in the building.  

About The U.S. Green Building Council

The Washington, D.C.-based U.S. Green Building Council is committed to a prosperous and sustainable future for our nation through cost-efficient and energy-saving green buildings.

With a community comprising 80 local affiliates, more than 18,000 member companies and organizations, and more than 167,000 LEED Professional Credential holders, USGBC is the driving force of an industry that is projected to contribute $554 billion to the U.S. gross domestic product from 2009-2013. USGBC leads an unlikely diverse constituency of builders and environmentalists, corporations and nonprofit organizations, elected officials and concerned citizens, and teachers and students.

Buildings in the United States are responsible for 39% of CO2 emissions, 40% of energy consumption, 13% water consumption and 15% of GDP per year, making green building a source of significant economic and environmental opportunity. Greater building efficiency can meet 85% of future U.S. demand for energy, and a national commitment to green building has the potential to generate 2.5 million American jobs.

About LEED

The U.S. Green Building Council's LEED green building certification system is the foremost program for the design, construction and operation of green buildings. Over 100,000 projects are currently participating in the LEED rating systems, comprising over 8 billion square feet of construction space in all 50 states and 114 countries.

By using less energy, LEED-certified buildings save money for families, businesses and taxpayers; reduce greenhouse gas emissions; and contribute to a healthier environment for residents, workers and the larger community.

USGBC was co-founded by current President and CEO Rick Fedrizzi, who spent 25 years as a Fortune 500 executive. Under his 15-year leadership, the organization has become the preeminent green building, membership, policy, standards, influential, education and research organization in the nation.

For more information, visit www.usgbc.org.