List of Adaptive Technologies

List of Adaptive Technologies

The following Adaptive Technologies are available at Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library and are also networked to all other locations:
  • JAWS - screen reader for people who are blind
  • MAGic - screen magnifier for people with low vision
  • WYNN Wizard - scanning and literacy software for people with learning disabilities
The following stand-alone devices are available in some library locations:
  • Topaz - closed circuit television video magnifiers that magnify printed text up to 70 times
  • SARA - stand-alone scanning and reading device: simple to use, self-contained print-to-speech systems that have large tactile buttons that make them ideal for first-time users
Technologies for Customers who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing
  • Video Relay Service: two-way video station that allows American Sign Language access to remote video stations and conventional telephones via a free remote sign language interpreter. (MLK Only)
  • Handheld Amplifier (PocketTalker): audio amplifier that allows users with T-switch hearing aids to amplify conversation.  Available at 25 branch locations and Martin Luther King Reading Rooms.
  • Induction Loop Assistive Listening Device: electromagnetic loops that amplify sound that is already amplified in a Public Address system, for people who are hard of hearing and who wear hearing aids with telecoil or T-switch:  Room A-5 of the Martin Luther King Library.
  • TTY: telephone typewriter permits an individual who is deaf, hard-of-hearing or has a speech difficulty to make and receive telephone calls. The conversation is read on a lighted display screen and/or a paper printout on the TTY. Persons using a TTY may call any standard phone user by placing the call through Telecommunications Relay Service, or they may call another TTY user directly.
The following adaptive technologies are available only in the Center for Accessibility at the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library:
  • Screen Reader Software - describes information on a computer screen in synthesized speech for people who are blind or have difficulty reading: JAWS and WindowEyes.
  • Screen Magnification Software - magnifies information on a computer screen for people who have low vision: ZoomText and Magic.
  • Print-to-Speech Readers and Software - convert printed text into synthesized speech by using a flatbed scanner and optical character recognition software through a PC:  Kurzweil 1000 and OpenBook.
  • Stand-alone Scanning and Reading devices - simple to use, self-contained print-to-speech systems that have large tactile buttons that make them ideal for first-time users:  The Freedom Scientific SARA.
  • Braille Translation software - translates digital text into digital Braille and sends it to be embossed by a Braille printer: Duxbury.
  • Braille Embosser - a Braille printer that embosses Braille onto specialized Braille paper: Juliet Interpoint Braille embosser.
  • Refreshable Braille Display - a hardware device that uses tactile pins to display Braille characters from a computer:  Freedom Scientific has a PacMate 20-cell Braille display on loan to the library.
  • Pacmate Accessible Pocket PC - portable hand-held computer accessible to blind and low vision users: Pocket Word, Internet Explorer, Windows Media Player, with JAWS built in.
  • Speech Recognition: software converts spoken language into digital text, as an alternative to keyboard text input: Dragon Naturally Speaking.
  • CCTVs - closed circuit television or video magnifiers that magnify printed text up to 50 times:  Tabletop models include SmartView, MagniSight , MyReader and Topaz. Handheld model is  Senseview.  PC-compatible models include Optelec and Prisma. Tabletop model CCTVs are also available in six neighborhood libraries: Cleveland Park, Palisades, Lamond-Riggs, Capitol View, Washington Highlands, and Woodridge.
  • Adjustable furniture - includes computer tables that adjust in height by electronic switch from 29 to 45 inches to suit the needs of individual patrons. Adjustable keyboard and mouse trays adjust to any angle and height to accommodate physical mobility issues.
  • 7-Large screen (27”) computer monitors - one on an adjustable arms so screens can be pulled close to the face for better viewing.  Monitors are on three-part extendable Monitor Arms.
  • Low-tech adaptive technology - adhesive tactile dots on a keyboard give users who are blind or have low vision an anchor around which to navigate the keyboard quickly.  Wide felt-tip markers make handwriting accessible to users with low vision. A hand-held Braille Labeler produces labels for common office items. The library has a sample large-key calculator, talking tape measure, TV amplifier and other items.
  • Typing Training software - lets blind or low vision learn touch typing: Talking Typer, Talking Typing Tutor.
  • Accessible Portable AudioBook Players - portable devices that allow the user to listen to digital audio books in various formats: Victor Reader Stream and BookSense for Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (LBPH) downloadable digital Talking Books; Victor Wave for Recording for the Blind and Dyslexic CDs (for loan to LBPH patrons); Creative Zen Stone for the library’s downloadable Overdrive and Recorded Books (demonstration only); Playaways (for loan to all DCPL patrons).
  • Handheld Digital Photo and Reading Device - the Kurzweil National Federation of the Blind Mobile Reader is a portable reading device that takes a photo of printed text and reads it back to the user using a synthesized voice.
  • RollerMouse Pro - an ergonomic pointing device that helps prevent strain and tension of upper extremity muscles, including shoulders and elbows.
  • Adjustable workstation ergonomic accessories - Ergoform adjustable keyboard tray, and monitor arm accommodate many body types.
  • Portable CCTV - the Humanware SenseView is a hand-held portable video magnifier that magnifies from 4 to 22 times
  • Simplified Computer Access Guide software by EVAS - makes it easy for first-time users who are blind or visually impaired to use a Windows computer.
  • Open Source Software ReadPlease - text-to-speech software, the Thunder ScreenReader, and DesktopZoom ScreenMagnifier are all open source softwares.
  • Augmentative communication device - a communication board that let users with physical disabilities communicate by punching various programmable labeled buttons: Cheaptalk 8 + Universal Iconmaker CD.
  • Alternative Mice - easier to access for people with physical disabilities:  Trackball, RollerBall, RollerMouse.
  • Alternative Keyboards - with large print keys, larger key size or alternative key arrangement: Zoomtext Keyboard, BigKeys. 
  • Magnifying Glasses and handheld magnifying lenses - in various strengths from 2x to 10x with LCD illumination: 3X LED Magnifiers available at branches and in Martin Luther King reading rooms.
  • Braille Note hand-held PDA - with refreshable Braille display and keyboard.
  • PacMate - another hand-held PDA with voice access.
  • BookSense Portable Book Reader - a competitor to Victor Stream, but with 4Gb memory, a radio and wireless capability.
  • Digital DTB Player - the new Digital Talking Book Reader from the National Library Service (NLS).  Plays books on cartridges or downloaded over the Internet.  Allows for navigation by chapter at the push of a button.
  • PlayAway - one-book-per-player MP3 audio book device that you can borrow from the library and return just like a print book.
  • Accessible Games - chess and card games that have tactile markings and large print.
  • OpenBook - scanning and reading system for people who are blind
  • Kidspiration - visual organization software for kids
  • InspireData - visual organization software with an emphasis on math
  • Inspiration - visual organization software for people with learning disabilities
  • Word Prediction - WordQ and SpeakQ software that make writing easier by offering suggestions and using voice recognition.
  • Switches - large one-click buttons that can be used along with software to make computer access easy and fun for people who have physical or intellectual limitations that prevent them from gaining access to computers.
  • Switch Games - software that can be used in combination with button switches.
  • Head Tracker and On-screen Keyboard optical mouse - for people who have limited physical dexterity. A reflective dot is worn on the forehead and a camera and software track the positioning and translate this into mouse movements and clicks. ScreenDoor on-screen keyboard allows alphabetical and numerical typing using the HeadTracker.
  • iPad and iTouch -- mobile technologies with gestural interfaces made by Apple.  Both have the Voiceover screenreader and Zoom magnification.
  • AbleGamers Adaptive Gaming Station