Domestication and Evolution

Cleveland Park Library

Domestication and Evolution

How Humans and Animals Became Domesticated


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There are footprints in petrified mud on a cave floor in France. They are of a boy and a dog/wolf. They are 26,000 years old.  30,000 year old dog remains have been identified in Belgium. Dogs have been a part of the human experience for thousands of years. They helped humans domesticate sheep, goats, cattle and horses.

Temple Grandin in Animals in Translation  charts the differences between tame and domestic animals and the role of both fear and curiosity in domestication.

Mark Derr's books, How the Dog Became the Dog and Dog's Best Friend, explore the idea that humans didn't simply, by force of intellect and will, tame wild animals. Animals got something out of it too -- survival in numbers.

The co-evolution of animals will be the subject of a discussion at 2 p.m., on Saturday, March 24, in the first floor auditorium. Bring your ideas and experiences with animals. Former or current farmers welcome. There will also be a film screening, the Rise of the Dog.