An Exhibition of the Bookbinding Art of Stanley M. Sherman

Examples of Stanley M. Sherman's bookbinding

Please join us Friday, May 25 for an exhibition of the bookbinding art of Stanley M. Sherman.

There will be 24 extraordinary creations, many featured in the 2006 solo exhibition at the Walters Art Museum, on display. Mr. Sherman will be present to discuss his work.

Before becoming a bookbinder, Stanley M. Sherman, A. I. A., had a distinguished career as an architect and city planner. Stan received his architectural degree from the Harvard Graduate School of Design. While there, he studied with I. M. Pei, and later worked in the noted architect's office.

After receiving a Fulbright fellowship to study city planning in the Netherlands and teaching architecture at the University of Michigan, he moved to Washington. Since then, he has served as an architect and city planner for D.C.'s urban renewal agency, where he also directed a review panel of consultant architects for rebuilding projects. During that time he was a visiting critic at various architecture schools and published articles and reviews in architectural and urban planning journals.

Stan's work in bookbinding has spanned 20 years, starting during his architectural career and continuing after his retirement. He learned and practiced the art in the studio of Tom Albro, longtime chief rare book conservator at the Library of Congress. Beginning around 1986, he started to produce design bindings for clients, including authors who desired a unique copy of his or her published work. Stan also took considerable pride in designing bindings for books written by his wife and son.

He is a member of the Canadian Bookbinders and Book Artists Guild, Great Britain’s Designer Bookbinders and the Guild of Book Workers. His design binding, A System of Architectural Ornament by Louis H. Sullivan, was featured in the Guild of Book Workers 2000 – 2002 traveling exhibition, “The Best of the Best." 

Stan’s approach to bookbinding reflects his training as an architect. His method is founded on structure, function and materials as the basis for his designs. He combines a solid command of craft with an innovative visual sense, using familiar as well as unconventional materials.

Many works have three-dimensional elements that produce unique and striking objects that are aesthetically pleasing. A similar meticulous approach underlies his work on restorations and repairs, slipcases and boxes. Stan holds every commission he undertakes to the best traditions and standards of the craft.