Adaptive Services

Published on Thursday, June 26, 2014

 
 
Baltimores Deaf HeritageBaltimore’s Deaf Heritage
 
 
with
 
 
Kathleen (Kat) Brockway
 
Deaf rights advocate and author of  Baltimore’s Deaf Heritage (Arcadian Publishing, June 2014)
 
 
Wednesday, August 13, 2014


 
6 –  8:30 p.m.
 
 
Room A-10
 

Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Library
901 G Street, NW
Washington, DC   20001
 
 
Author will sign copies of book following the program. Book signing and reception sponsored by FOLDA (Friends of Libraries for Deaf Action).
 
 
DESCRIPTION:

The booming job market and beautifully designed city of Baltimore attracted many families and individuals to the area in the 19th century. Several of these transplants would become prominent figures in the Deaf community. George W. Veditz, an early American Sign Language filmmaker and former president of the National Association of the Deaf; Rev. Daniel E. Moylan, founder of the oldest operational Methodist church for the deaf; and George Michael “Dummy” Leitner, a professional baseball player, all influenced Baltimore’s growing deaf population. Through vintage photographs of successful organizations and sports teams, including the Silent Oriole Club, Christ Church of the Deaf, the Jewish Deaf Society of Baltimore, the Silent Clover Society, and the National Fraternal Society for the Deaf, Baltimore’s Deaf Heritage illustrates the evolution of Baltimore’s Deaf community and its prominent leaders.

Author Bio: Kathleen Brockway, the deaf author, is an advocate for deaf rights and historical and political recognition. She was inspired by the stories of the deaf heritage in Baltimore and determined to share them with the public. She retrieved images from living descendants of Baltimore’s earliest deaf families, deaf organizations, Maryland School for the Deaf, the Gallaudet University archives, and Maryland natives to present this rich history. She is currently chair of the Library Friends Section of the National Association of the Deaf (NAD) and the archivist for the Model Secondary School for the Deaf (MSSD) Museum.
 
 
For more information, contact:
 
Janice Rosen, Librarian for the Deaf Community
 
·      Voice and Videophone: 202.559.5368;

  • Email:  Janice.Rosen@dc.gov

 

Published on Thursday, June 26, 2014

The Life Story of Mother Delight Rice and Her Children
 
Delia Delight Rice was the first teacher of the deaf in the Philippines and her story is told by one of her adopted children, who is an author, a photographer, and a deaf community leader

 
Ron HiranoRonald M. Hirano
 
Monday, July 14, 2014
 
6 – 8 p.m.
 
Room 215 (Adaptive Services Division)
 
Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Library
901 G Street, NW
Washington, DC   20001
 


THE BOOK:
 

'A Long, Fatal Love Chase' by Louisa May Alcott

Published on Tuesday, June 3, 2014

book coverThis romantic cliffhanger about a woman pursued by her ex-lover, a relentless stalker, seems sprung from today's headlines. Yet Alcott (1832-1888) wrote it more than a century and a quarter ago, in 1866 (two years before the appearance of Little Women), only to see it rejected it as ``too sensational'' by the magazine that had requested it. The novel has remained unpublished until now. Its heroine, the lonely, trusting 18-year-old Rosamond Vivian, who lives with her flinty, unloving grandfather on an English island, falls for the cynical, suave Phillip Tempest, who's nearly twice her age.

One Young Deaf Woman's Education

Published on Friday, May 23, 2014

Building Bridges Crossing Borders

Talking Book Club, June 19

Published on Thursday, May 15, 2014

book coverWritten in 1866, A Long Fatal Love Chase is now published for the first time.

Rosamond Vivian, 18, lives with her grandfather on an island estate off England's coast. She longs to escape the solitude, and the chance arrives in the form of Phillip Tempest, almost twice her age. They marry, and he takes her with him to his villa near Nice. But Rosamond soon suspects that all is not as it first appeared. She even fears that her husband is a murderer.

Talking Book Club, May 15

Published on Friday, April 18, 2014

book cover The Man Who Loved Books Too Much, by Allison Hoover Bartlett.

Journalist investigates famed rare-book thief John Gilkey to uncover his motivation for stealing exquisite literature. Retraces the cat-and-mouse game Gilkey played with Ken Sanders, security chair of the Antiquarian Booksellers' Association of America, in the late 1990s and early 2000s.

'Preservation of the Sign Language' (1913)

Published on Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Veditz Film Preservation of Sign LanguageGeorge W. Veditz' historic 1913 film Preservation of the Sign Language, a silent film, will be shown on Monday, April 7 in the Great Hall.

The film is in American Sign Language with no voice or captions. 

ASL/Voice interpreters will be present. 

Printed copies in English of the film transcript will be available.

Discussion to follow film.

Talking Book Club, April 17

Published on Friday, March 21, 2014

book coverShortly after elderly Jane Neal finally agrees to participate in the art show to be held in her small village outside of Montreal, she is killed by an arrow through the heart.

As Chief Inspector Gamache investigates, he wonders if her unusual artwork provides a clue to her murder.

Still Life is available as DB 66731 in the Library for the Blind, and in Regular Print and Large Print in the DC Public Library Fiction collection. 

Two Short Works by Famous Authors

Published on Friday, March 21, 2014

In March we will discuss two short, less-known works by famous authors:

bridge coverThe Bridge of San Luis Rey by Thornton Wilder

"How to Train Your Dragon"

Published on Tuesday, March 11, 2014

DVD cover of "How to train your dragon" movieDear LBPH Kids,

How to Train Your Dragon is our Adaptive Services Division children’s movie recommendation for March 2014.

In this movie, “Hiccup is a Viking teenager who aspires to hunt dragons, but doesn't exactly fit in with his tribe's longstanding tradition of heroic dragon slayers. His world gets turned upside down when he encounters a dragon that challenges him and his fellow Vikings to see the world from an entirely different point of view.”

'Cutting for Stone' by Abraham Verghese

Published on Saturday, February 1, 2014

stone coverEthiopia, 1954. Twin brothers Shiva and Marion Stone’s Indian-nun mother dies during their birth and their British father abandons them. As revolution brews decades later, Marion, a surgeon, flees to America, where he eventually confronts his past.

This book, pubished in 2009, is in the Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped collection as DB 70131 (21 hrs, 24 min) and in the main DC Public Library collection in Regular Print, Large Print, Book on CD, e-book and e-audio.

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