Brandon Digwood's Book Reviews

"The Graveyard Book" by Neil Gaiman

This year's Newberry and Caldecott Awards (among many others) will be announced in just a few weeks at the American Library Association Midwinter Meeting in Boston. Given that, I felt I should highlight some previous winners, and I would like to start with last year's Newberry Award winner, The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman.

Nobody Owens is a normal boy, except for one thing. He was raised by ghosts and other denizens of the graveyard. They have kept him safe since he stumbled into the graveyard as a baby, barely escaping from the man who murdered his family. Now, the only way for them to keep him safe is to keep him in the graveyard. However, there are many kinds of trouble a little boy can get into even while in a graveyard, and Bod is sure to encounter them all.

Some parts of the book are left purposely enigmatic; Bod’s guardian Silas is never named for the creature of the night he is, but enough hints are dropped that savvy readers can guess what he is. This book is about Bod and his growth into a confident young man, and it splendidly shows his unique qualities by his interactions with people in everyday life.

If you like humor mixed with horror, and are tired of reading Goosebumps and Fear Street books, then The Graveyard Book should be next on your list. This book is a great read for tween and young teen readers. Check it out along with the other works of Neil Gaiman at your local DCPL public library.