Friends Book Discussion Series Continues

The Hebrew Bible: Ten Questions for Thought

Ori Z. Soltes, resident scholar in theology and fine arts at Georgetown University, will lead the talk on The Hebrew Bible: Genesis, I and II Samuel, on Wednesday, February 10, from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., in the second session of the West End Library Friends discussion series on the theme of love and strife in literature.  The talk will take place in the small meeting room on the 2nd floor.  All are invited to attend and join the discussion that will be based on the following ten questions:

1 How might we—how ought we, and how have we historically tended to—allocate responsibility for disobeying God to Adam and Eve? (Gen 2-3)

2 How exactly are we to understand Cain—both his crime and the condemnation that leads to his punishment—both with respect to his own generation and that of his parents and his descendants? (Gen 4)

3 How might we—how ought we, and how have we tended historically to—understand the respective roles of Abraham and Sarah in the fate of Isaac and Ishmael as we find them in the biblical text (Gen 6-17 and 21-22)

4 What are the similarities and differences between the homecoming of Jacob (Gen 32-33) and the dialogue between Joseph and his brothers at the time of Jacob’s death (Gen 50?

5 How and why are Judah and Joseph paralleled in Genesis 38 and 39?

6 How does the Joseph narrative present an expansion of the dream motif a) that began with his own father Jacob’s dreaming; and b) as it moves though Josephs’ own life? (Gen 28, 32, 37, 40, 41, 42)

7 How might we understand the father-son complications in the relationship between Samuel and Saul in the progression of the following three passages—I Samuel 9-10, I Samuel 15-16, and I Samuel 28?

8 How does God figure into the issues offered in the previous question?

9 How might we compare Saul to Greek heroes and their weaknesses (their “Achilles’ heels) in his relationship with God; and their relationships with their children in his relationship with Jonathan, Michal and David (I Samuel 16, 18-20, 26)?

10 What of David’s relationships: with Saul as a father, with Michal and Jonathan, with his own son, Absalom—and with Nathan and God (I Samuel 16, 18-20, 26, II Samuel 1, 3, 7, 11-12, 13-19, 24)?