Staff Picks

Book One in the "Walking Chaos" Trilogy

Published on Friday, April 18, 2014

Imagine the horror of every innermost thought being heard by everyone around you. For Todd, it's the only way of life he's ever known. He hears the constant noise of the other men in Prentisstown, horrible angry Noise, 

The Knife of Never Letting Go book coverfull of violence and fear. He even hears the Noise of this faithful dog, Manchee. All of them counting down the days till Todd, the last boy in town, has his next birthday and becomes a man. What do the women in the town think? Well, there aren't any women, the last of them died around the time Todd was born. Todd's day-to-day life is changed when he stumbles upon a place of complete silence in the swamp. What could cause this type of silence? And how can he keep it a secret when everything he thinks can be heard by everyone?

This book is a really remarkable story about the struggle to accept a new reality. It reads as a dystopian novel about a society gone wrong, but it feels more like a coming of age story. There is profound loss throughout the narrative, but the characters' inner dialog moves you quickly through the story, without much time to grieve.

This is a must-read for anyone wondering what to read after The Hunger Games, and Divergent trilogies. 

The author, Patrick Ness, was born in Alexandria, VA, and currently resides in London. This title was received numerous awards including the Booktrust Teenage Prize, the Guardian Children's Fiction Prize, and the 2008 Tiptree Award. It was also included on the shortlist for the Carnegie Medal. All three titles of the Chaos Walking trilogy are available at the library. 
 

 

Published on Friday, April 18, 2014

Gruffalo ClipartOn April 13, our 2 p.m. Family Funday Sunday featured that creature with terrible tusks, and terrible claws, and terrible teeth in his terrible jaws. You know the one – with knobbly knees and turned-out toes, and a poisonous wart at the end of his nose. That fella whose eyes are orange, whose tongue is black, and who has those purple prickles all over his back!

Oh, yeah… It was all about him!

Here are more Gruffalo stories to read and watch.


Five fun tunes

Published on Friday, April 18, 2014

Welcome to the new Northeast Library blog series, called Your Friday Five!

Each week, the children's and teen staff will round up five of their favorite resources and reads around a certain topic. This Friday, we are highlighting five fun tunes you can find on Freegal!

If you're anything like me, you go on serious music kicks where you only listen to a particular genre for a while. It doesn't happen often, but when it does, I just can't get enough of it! Lately I've been listening to a lot of folk, folk rock and alternative rock. Here are the top five songs on my iPod's Recently Played playlist. 

Shakespeare's 450th Birthday Edition

Published on Friday, April 18, 2014

April 23 is the 450th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s birth, as well as World Book Night, so it seemed fitting that this Friday Five should show the fascination that Shakespeare and his work still holds for the world today.

While the DC Public Library certainly has all of Shakespeare’s plays and sonnets in the collection, I wanted to feature more recent non-fiction and fiction books that showcase Shakespeare and his work.

Published on Thursday, April 17, 2014

Happy National Library Week! April 17 is "Support Teen Literature Day," which, in the words of the American Library Association (ALA), raises "awareness among the general public that young adult literature is a vibrant, growing genre with much to offer today's teens."

What sets young adult (YA) books apart from adult books? According to the ALA, YA books

Lauren's picks for picture books you can sing!

Published on Monday, April 14, 2014

Singing is an important practice to engage in with babies, toddlers, and preschoolers to build vital pre-reading skills. Among other things, singing slows down language, allowing children time to hear and process sounds and syllables in words.

There are lots of picture books with naturally rhythmic text that you can read to a melody you already know or one you make up; here are just five that are perfect for children ages 0-5 and really lend themselves to singing.


Jazz for the Young

Published on Friday, April 11, 2014

Welcome to new Northeast Library blog series, Your Friday Five! Each week, the children's and teen staff will round up five of their favorite resources and reads around a certain topic. This Friday, in honor of April as Jazz Appreciation Month, we are highlighting five great jazz books for youth.

Music and singing are an easy and enjoyable way to involve children in language. It helps children learn and remember new words and to hear the smaller sounds in words. Strong vocabularies and being able to hear the syllables in words are critical to helping children be ready to learn to read.

Please enjoy these titles as you explore the world of Jazz!

A Spring Break event for kids on Monday, April 14 at 3 p.m.

Published on Thursday, April 10, 2014
Palindromania!  by Jon Agee

What do these phrases have in common?

'Doll Bones'

Published on Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Tween Book Club Would you run away from home to bury a haunted doll to avoid a curse?

That is one of the many questions Northeast Library tweens discussed at the Tween Book Club for Doll Bones by Holly Black

Ahwoo!

Published on Tuesday, April 8, 2014

incorrigibleHave you ever heard the expression, "Those children must have been raised by wolves!" to refer to children that are exceptionally naughty?

Well, Alexander, Beowulf and Cassiopeia Incorrigible were!

Their young nanny, Miss Penelope Lumley, had taught them the Greek classics, stopped them from chasing squirrels and given them lots of love and affection. Now they only howl at the full moon, and chase chickens once in a while. 

Published on Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Understand RapDeciphering hip hop lyrics can be quite the task for someone who does not follow the genre of music.

Rest assured, Understand Rap is a funny read that breaks down some of the most popular, controversial, and humorous rap lines into digestible language even a parent could understand.

Best for teens and older.

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