News Releases

New Libraries to Open in June

Published on Monday, April 30, 2012

The Washington Highlands Interim Library closes Saturday, May 19.  The new library at 115 Atlantic St., SW opens Wednesday, June 13.  Additionally, the Francis A. Gregory Interim Library closes Saturday, May 26.  The new library at 3660 Alabama Ave., SE opens Tuesday, June 19.
 
Each new library is 22,000 square feet and features:

Published on Friday, April 20, 2012

The Lamond-Riggs Neighborhood Library will be closed Saturday, April 21, 2012 and Monday, April 23, 2012 for emergency maintenance.   It is scheduled to re-open on Tuesday, April 24 at its regular time.

Published on Tuesday, April 17, 2012

The DC Public Library has selected the award-winning team of Wienceck + Associates and Bing Thom Architects to design the new Woodridge Neighborhood Library.  Located at 1801 Hamlin St. NE, the new building will be the first library in the United States designed by internationally acclaimed architect Bing Thom.

“We have been fortunate to have talented and internationally recognized architects design libraries for the District,” said Ginnie Cooper, chief librarian for the District of Columbia.  “With this architect team, the District's new libraries will continue to inspire people in the city's neighborhoods as well as around the world."

Published on Wednesday, March 28, 2012

To serve customers better, the DC Public Library will implement a new fee policy for overdue or lost books starting Friday, April 6. 

There will be no daily late fees under the new guidelines.   Instead, items that are 30 days or more overdue will have a “long overdue” flat fee of $5 per item.  Items that are overdue 60 days or more will be considered lost or damaged and will carry an additional fee ranging from $8 - $20 depending on the type of item (i.e., magazine, paperback, hardcover, DVD, etc.), in addition to the “long overdue” $5 fee. 

"The easiest way to avoid library fees is by returning items on time," said Ginnie Cooper, chief librarian of the District of Columbia.  "If a book is kept past its due date, the new fees make it easier for people to know what they owe without penalizing them so harshly that they don't want to visit the Library."

Published on Wednesday, March 21, 2012

The DC Public Library is upgrading its catalog system on Thursday, March 22.  During the upgrade customers will not be able to download ebooks or music, place holds on books or other library materials, or register for a library card.

The improved catalog system will be available on Friday, March 23.  We apologize for any inconvenience.

Launches Review to Test Report Findings

Published on Monday, March 5, 2012

The Urban Land Institute (ULI) released its final report today after conducting a week-long review of the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library building last November. Based on the results of the ULI report, the DC Public Library will begin an in-depth analysis next month to determine the feasibility and cost of implementing the scenarios.

"The analysis is the next step in a long process that will help us figure out how to make the District's central library a spectacular place for residents," said Ginnie Cooper, chief librarian of the District of Columbia.

The ULI report outlined three scenarios for consideration without necessarily recommending one over the other. All scenarios will require significant investment by District government for major improvements to the building, according to the report.

Published on Thursday, February 16, 2012

The Watha T. Daniel/Shaw Library will be closed Monday, Feb. 27 – Wednesday, Feb. 29 to improve the sewage equipment in order to handle more capacity.  The Library will re-open on Thursday, March 1.  Library users are encouraged to use and can pick up holds at the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G Street, NW.  We apologize for the inconvenience.

Published on Wednesday, February 15, 2012

The DC Public Library has selected Whiting-Turner Construction and RBK Construction, with Bell Architects and Vines Architecture, as the design/build team for the Northeast Library Interior Renovation. 
 
Located at  330 7th Street NE, the Northeast Neighborhood Library is the fourth oldest public library building in the city still in operation.  The Georgian Revival style building, which first opened in 1932, will be modernized to provide state-of-the-art library services, while retaining the building's historic character.
 
The design phase will take six months and include: restoration of original woodwork; new plumbing, electrical and HVAC systems; improved lighting; increased space for library programs; larger meeting room; quiet study rooms; new restrooms; new elevator; and new and restored furnishings and fixtures. 
 

Published on Monday, February 6, 2012

Requests for commercial or news photography or filming at the DC Public Library are approved by the Library’s Office of Communications. 

To obtain permission, send a written request (e-mail is acceptable) to:

George Williams
Media Relations Manager
Desk: 202-727-1184
Mobile: 202-596-0345
E-mail: George.Williams2@dc.gov

Please include the following information in the request:

  • Purpose of the project
  • Preferred date(s) of filming
  • Subject matter
  • Who will be filmed
  • An e-mail and phone number for the person making the request

Important Notes

  • A member of the Library’s Office of Communications will accompany all camera crews and photographers.
  • If library users are to be filmed, a consent form must be signed and a copy provided to the library.

Published on Tuesday, January 31, 2012

The Anacostia and Watha T. Daniel/Shaw libraries have been awarded LEED Gold for environmentally-friendly design.  They’re the 224th and 225th buildings, respectively, in D.C. to be certified as Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design buildings, and the 10th and 11th District government buildings, respectively, to receive Gold certifications.

"The Library is happy to play a role in District having more green buildings per capita than any state in the US," said Ginnie Cooper, chief librarian of the District of Columbia. "As the number of people who use libraries in the District continues to increase, our new buildings can show how environmentally-friendly design can improve their experience."

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